Artists for Part 5

Louise Bourgeois, Marlene Dumas, Elizabeth Peyton, Wangechi Mutu, Chloe Piene

My tutor Joanne Mulvihill- Allen has suggested several artists whose work could be inspiring for my approach to Part 5.

LOUISE BOURGEOIS

Why am I so touched by Louise Bourgeois drawings?

I do not feel the same for the sculptures , but the drawings have such a personal vulnerable quality that really connects to my own fears and vulnerability.

They seem so quickly loosely scribbled, but just on the spot touch that sense of beauty while being scary and unsettling at the same time.

 

images-5

I wrote about Louise Bourgeois in an earlier post this year, after seeing her room at the Tate Modern in London and had to create a new category for that- the human figure- emotions. Although I felt a certain fascination then as well, I am observing how much deeper I am touched now.

Even her “patterns” or “scribbles” take organic shapes that resonate with some inner organs and movement.

Inspired by discovering these drawings again, I will experiment with drawing the poses of Assignment 5 in red watercolor and approach the form much more fluidly and less detailed than I have til now.

Momaorg. 2017. Momaorg. [Online]. [13 July 2017]. Available from: https://www.moma.org/explore/collection/lb/themes

MARLENE DUMAS

The south African artist Marlene Dumas uses all kind of photographs -portraits and figures- from newspapers and magazines as a starting point, then translates them into her very personal paintings by cropping, the choice of colours and mixing of several approaches in the same painting, like spots and splashes, blurred parts, scribbled, sketched sections and more.

 

In the above series “Models” she explores beauty models but also women that she considers role models, like Gertude Stein.

I really enjoy this loose, not detailed almost monochrome paintings and how they work in a series. It reminds me of the series of women by Tina Berning I wrote about earlier in this course.

She uses a similar language for figures and nudes- the shapes hinted at, the paint bleeding, some details standing out. This again is something I would like to explore directly for the Assignment 5 postures.

She often explores the theme of death or sorrow through various angles, like finding modern images of la Pieta in photographs of war or disaster zones.  Here is a self portrait as a skull that she drew to illustrate an interview with her in the magazine Zeit:

self portrait

 

Marlenedumasnl. 2017. Marlenedumasnl. [Online]. [26 June 2017]. Available from: http://www.marlenedumas.nl/

Marlenedumasnl. 2017. Marlenedumasnl. [Online]. [26 June 2017]. Available from: http://www.marlenedumas.nl/wp-content/uploads/D-2015-Zeit-Magazin-short.pdf

ELISABETH PEYTON

I wrote a post about Elisabeth Peyton for Part 4- the face, where I focused more on her paintings with blocks of bold colors:

I think I was initially a little disturbed by the fact that she paints mostly famous artists or royalty, often from photographs, but now I have listened to a few of her talks and interviews and feel that I understand her attraction and curiosity. She is fascinated by stars as creators, as people who really make great things, and by how their genius and creativity shines through their features- which is what Elisabeth Peyton is capturing.

In her drawings I found a lot of the finished/unfinished balance that am drawn to experiment with.

I love how she focuses on the features, which is what fascinates her, and then leaves the rest of the drawing uncolored and “unfinished”.

Gladstonegallerycom. 2017. Gladstonegallerycom. [Online]. [17 April 2017]. Available from: http://www.gladstonegallery.com/artist/elizabeth-peyton/work

WANGECHI MUTU

Contrary to the sparse reduced works of Louise Bourgeois or Marlene Dumas above, Wangeshi Mutu’s art is an explosion of information and color and pattern.  She creates fantastic worlds, or fantastic journeys through collage and drawing.

I am really fascinated by Wangeshi Mutu’s work. It is a combination of pretty and gruesome, of playful and horrendous, with flowers and fantastic creatures mixed with women with chopped off limbs.

untitled1-643x845

I also found myself really enjoying her video works that almost feel like drawings, with one motive unfolding slowly with sound and movement.

http://wangechimutu.com/art/in-motion/

In an interview with the curator of her show at the Brooklyn Museum (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ux0C_c08dto), Wangemushi explains that her fictional dreamlike mythlike works express her opinions on questions like gender and colonisation, but they also act as portals for the viewer to access something very personal. This is how I feel when looking at her works- they allow the imagination to dive in and continue creating.

Wangechimutucom. 2017. Wangechimutucom. [Online]. [16 July 2017]. Available from: http://wangechimutu.com/art/in-space/

CHLOE PIENE

“Drawing is the first thing and it is the final thing, so it can encompass everything”

“Drawing is primal, drawing is underneath everything, drawing is your design, your mechanism, your motivation. Drawing is action.”

These are quotes from Chloe Pienes speech seen in the video from the exhibition Drawing now  2015 (you tube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6EM_ky_hkZg)

She explains how the seen and the unseen work together. The figures are floating and also there is no horizon line, so the figure itself totally defines the space, almost as if they are the space themselves.

At first I had a difficult time liking the ragged disjointed drawings of Chloe Piene. After reading more about the artist and hearing her explain the work, I feel more drawn to it and am curious to explore using a very free line.

Chloepienecom. 2017. Chloepienecom. [Online]. [18 July 2017]. Available from: http://chloepiene.com/work.html


All of the artists I have taken a look at here, inspire to create more freely, with feeling and spontaneity. It is definitely a path away from realism or illustration and I feel inspired to experiment and explore.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s