»Augen. Blicke. Impressionen.«

French Impressionists in the Staatsgalerie Stuttgart

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When I hear the term Impressionists, I immediately recall pictures of landscape paintings, so I was delighted to be able to catch an exhibition with this theme now while still studying  landscape for Part 3. I was quite surprised to discover that the exhibition only contained a small part of landscape painting, but also the human figure, persons in their environment and still life.

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Claude Monet, Fileds in spring from 1882- this is the type of painting I was expecting to see here. Impressionists capturing the beauty and mood of the landscape with ever changing light and colours, rather than representing it realistically. The figure remains unknown as a part of the landscape.

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Armand Guillaumin, River landscape near Crozant, 1896- this pastel drawing attracted my attention by the bold way the artist left parts of the paper uncovered.

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As I am still drawing trees for landscape, I took a closer look at this painting from 1872 by Camille Corot and admire the light here. I would have guessed this painting belonged rather to  romantic style than Impressionist.

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Paul Cezanne, the Bath from 1880/82- rather a study of the human body set in a landscape.

I was very happy to discover some paintings by Odilon Redon here- another artist I had just been exploring online for contrast, light and dark, earlier in the course. Here “Fighting Angel” from 1900 and “The origin of thought” from 1885. It is definitely a play of tones that is fascinating.

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Vincent van Goghs lithography “Gardener by an apple tree” from 1883 is another example of a human figure in the landscape. I am looking at the simplified trees and the distinction between foreground and background.

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Finally Paul Gaugins “Where are you going” from 1892, with the vibrant colours and heat of Tahiti. I have visited Paul Gaugin exhibitions several times previously, but I am still attracted to the combination of quiet and peace and vibrancy that his paintings share, as I am attracted to the tropical landscapes that has been my home for over 10 years now. Looking at this painting I feel a certain longing to be working with that landscape for this part of the course 🙂

 

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